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Healthy Eating Resources

Healthy Foods that Contain Zinc

Zinc is mineral that your body needs in trace amounts for a variety of different mechanisms.

What Does Zinc Do in Your Body? Read more about Healthy Foods that Contain Zinc

 

Bioflavonoids

Vitamin P, also called the bioflavonoids, is a group of water-soluble nutrients that work together with other components of vitamin C to: Read more about Bioflavonoids

 

The Health Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil

If you haven’t already read other articles that I’ve written on healthy vs. unhealthy fats and oils, you may not know that the healthiest oil that you can use on a daily basis is coconut oil.

Although coconut oil has always been a healthy food choice, its reputation suffered a great deal during the 80s and 90s when it was lumped together with other saturated fats as a cause of cardiovascular disease.

Coconut Oil Speeds Up Metabolism and Increases Energy Read more about The Health Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil

 

Healthy Foods that Contain Vitamin A

Many plant-based eaters are under the impression that they can obtain all the vitamin A that they need from plant foods that contain carotenoids, particularly beta carotene found in foods like spinach, sweet potatoes, and carrots.

It's true that some carotenoids like beta carotene can be converted to vitamin A in your body once they make it into your blood. What you may not know is that carotenoids are not always absorbed efficiently into your blood. Read more about Healthy Foods that Contain Vitamin A

 

Which Fruits and Vegetables are the Least and Most Contaminated with Pesticides?

Have you ever wondered which fruits and vegetables are the least and most contaminated with pesticides? A study released by the Environmental Working Group in 2003 revealed the following:

12 LEAST Contaminated Fruits and Vegetables

  • Asparagus
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Corn (sweet)
  • Kiwi
  • Mangos
  • Onions
  • Papaya
  • Pineapples
  • Peas (sweet)
Read more about Which Fruits and Vegetables are the Least and Most Contaminated with Pesticides?
 

Synthetic vs. Natural Vitamins

Here are some facts that you won’t find advertised on most of the vitamin supplements at your local vitamin store:

  • The majority of commercial vitamin supplements are made up of synthetic vitamins
  • Synthetic vitamins do not perform the same functions in your body as vitamins found naturally in whole food
  • Read more about Synthetic vs. Natural Vitamins
 

Choosing Healthy Fish For Nourishment

Throughout the history of the world, many cultures have used fish and fish broths to nourish their people. In the Chinese and Korean cultures, fish and fish broths have traditionally been used to properly nourish pregnant women and to promote a healthy supply of breast milk.

During his travels, renowned nutritionist and dentist, Dr. Weston A. Price found that populations that regularly consumed fish had thicker bones and better skeletal structure than those that consumed mainly red meat or mainly vegetables. Read more about Choosing Healthy Fish For Nourishment

 

Understanding Fats and Oils

Before the 1920s, heart disease was extremely rare in North America and other developed countries. When a young internist at Harvard University named Paul Dudley showed a German heart monitor to his fellow doctors, he was told that he best put his energy into a more profitable area of health care. This heart monitor, also known as an electrocardiogram, was able to detect blockages in the arteries that supply the heart. The problem was that heart disease was so rare that he struggled to find people who would benefit from his machine. Read more about Understanding Fats and Oils

 

The Health Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil

If you haven’t already read other articles that I’ve written on healthy vs. unhealthy fats and oils, you may not know that the healthiest oil that you can use on a daily basis is coconut oil.

Although coconut oil has always been a healthy food choice, its reputation suffered a great deal during the 80s and 90s when it was lumped together with other saturated fats as a cause of cardiovascular disease.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Coconut Oil May Speed Up Metabolism and Increase Energy
It’s true that 92 percent of the fatty acids in coconut oil are saturated. What many people don’t know is that over two-thirds of these saturated fatty acids are medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA). MCFAs are different from other varieties of saturated fatty acids in that as soon as they enter your bloodstream, they are taken to your liver where they are converted to energy. Whereas other dietary fats and even excess carbohydrates can be stored as fat in your cells, the MCFAs found in coconut oil provide an almost immediate source of energy and may actually speed up your metabolism.

Because of its potential ability to speed up metabolism, coconut oil is a good food choice for people with sluggish thyroid glands, as well as for people who find it difficult to shed unwanted weight.

The Safest Oil for Cooking
The high percentage of saturated fatty acids found in coconut oil makes it extremely stable when exposed to heat. Unlike almost all other vegetable oils, coconut oil contains virtually no trans fats, and is highly resistant to free radical formation when used for cooking at high temperatures. No other oil comes close to being as safe and healthy for cooking as coconut oil.

Coconut Oil May Help Those with Digestive Problems
Many people who have suffered with inflammatory conditions of the intestines like Crohn’s disease have successfully used coconut oil for its anti-inflammatory and soothing properties. Coconut oil's ability to help improve the balance of microorganisms in the intestines is likely another reason why people who suffer with digestive disorders benefit from using it on a regular basis. 

A Good All-Natural Moisturizer for Your Skin
In addition to its potential healing properties for your internal health, coconut oil makes for an exceptional skin moisturizer. First of all, it doesn’t contain any of the carcinogenic chemicals that are found in many commercial moisturizers. Secondly, coconut oil is easily absorbed into your skin, where it can help to prevent free radical damage, wrinkling, and sagging.  It may even be able to restore strength to the underlying connective tissue.

To summarize, here is some of what coconut oil may do for you:

  • Improve your energy
  • Reduce your risk of heart disease
  • Reduce your risk of cancer
  • Improve your digestion and ability to absorb nutrients
  • Promote weight loss and maintenance of your ideal weight
  • Help prevent bacterial, yeast, fungal, and viral infections
  • Support and enhance your immune system
  • Help regulate your blood sugar and prevent or control diabetes
  • Help prevent osteoporosis
  • Help prevent premature aging and wrinkling of the skin
  • Help keep your skin smooth and soft
  • Help protect against skin cancer and blemishes

Coconut oil does NOT do any of the following:

  • Does NOT contribute to heart disease
  • Does NOT contribute to weight problems
  • Does NOT increase blood cholesterol
  • Does NOT promote platelet stickiness or blood clot formation

In choosing a coconut oil for your daily needs, I recommend that you look for a source that fulfills the following guidelines for healthy virgin coconut oil:

  1. Should smell and taste like fresh coconuts
  2. Certified organic, USDA standards
  3. No hydrogenated oils / trans fats
  4. No chemicals or preservatives added
  5. Only fresh coconuts are used - no dried copra, which is used to make many other commercial coconut oils
  6. No refining, bleaching, or deodorizing
  7. No genetically modified coconuts (Non-GMO)
  8. Coconuts are from traditional palm trees only - no hybrid tress are used

For more scientific information about the properties of coconut oil, I recommend that you read Eat Fat, Lose Fat: Lose Weight And Feel Great With The Delicious, Science-based Coconut Diet, by Sally Fallon and Dr. Mary Enig. Read more about The Health Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil

 

Healthy vs. Unhealthy Fats and Oils

After graduating from chiropractic school, I made my way to a small Inuit village at the northern tip of Alaska to begin my first practice as a chiropractor. One of the most impressive memories I have of my time in northern Alaska was watching the natives haul a 20-foot whale onto the beach and divide the “muktuk” (whale blubber) into three by three sheets, one per family. I learned that the natives chopped these sheets of whale blubber into small pieces, about the size of small grapes, to be eaten raw and sometimes dipped in seal oil. In addition to whale blubber and seal oil, the natives continued to eat traditional staples such as whale meat, caribou meat, fish, and goose meat.

My observations in rural Alaska are congruent with the studies of Weston A. Price, a Harvard-trained dentist who traveled around the world in the 1930s, visiting many indigenous populations and observing their diets and health. Dr. Price found that the foods of isolated primitive peoples contained at least ten times the fat-soluble vitamins A and D found in modern diets. He also found that all healthy populations had at least one source of animal fat and protein in their diets, such as fatty fish, wild game, organ meats, eggs, and butter. These healthy populations did not suffer from heart disease, digestive problems, cancer, or obesity at the rates that we do.

For the past twenty years, we have been encouraged to believe that saturated fats and cholesterol, both found in animal fats, are the main causes of chronic degenerative diseases. Ask the average North American what they know about saturated fat, and the majority will answer that it causes heart disease. Ask the average high school student what they know about cholesterol, and they will tell you that it is bad for you. For years, I would have answered the same. Are these views on saturated fat and cholesterol with merit?

Here are some facts about saturated fats:

  • They make up at least 50 percent of our cell membranes, providing essential rigidity and strength
  • They enhance the immune system
  • They help incorporate calcium into our bones
  • Some of them have antimicrobial properties that protect us against harmful microorganisms in our
    digestive tracts

And here are some facts about cholesterol: Read more about Healthy vs. Unhealthy Fats and Oils

 

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