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Are White Rice and White Potatoes Harmful To Your Health?

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Updated on November 13, 2019

To continue where we left off in last week's newsletter, I'd like to share what I've learned over the years about eating white rice and potatoes.

I've found that it's generally true that eating rice and potatoes decreases cellular sensitivity to insulin, leading to higher blood glucose and a tendency to carry extra adipose tissue. These tendencies seem to grow with age, and at this point, we don't fully understand the biochemistry behind this - we can only state that as we age, skeletal muscle cells usually become less sensitive to insulin while fat cells become more sensitive to insulin, which leads to more uptake of glucose into our fat cells, fuelling their growth. Read more

 

How Much Sleep Do You Really Need To Be Healthy?

Few facets of your life have greater impact on your health status than the amount of quality rest that you get each night.

Why is your sleeping routine so important to your ability to prevent disease and be at your best? Read more

 

How the Body Works: Overview of Organ Systems

Updated on May 14, 2019

If you want to be relatively free of the fear of not knowing enough about your health that you have to rely on others to make big decisions for you, it's critical that you take some time to learn about how your body works. Read more

 

7 Ways to Care for Your Health Every Day

I'm often asked how to go about finding a family physician who emphasizes the importance of our daily choices and isn't quick to lean on prescription medications to address common health challenges. Read more

 

What to do About Cancer - Part One

Updated on February 1st, 2019

First, let's be clear on what cancer is and how it may hurt your health.

The building blocks of your brain, lungs, liver, heart, skin, and other organs are one or more of the following types of tissue: Read more

 

What to do About Cancer - Part Two

Updated on February 1st, 2019

In part one of this look at what to do about cancer, I expressed support for surgical excision of a malignant tumor whenever deemed prudent by those involved.

Generally, I don't feel as good about radiation and chemotherapy, but before I explain why, please allow me to say this: if you've already undergone radiation or chemotherapy, consider your body strong and resilient, having withstood the harmful effects of these therapies. Read more

 

Carbohydrate Cravings | Iron Deficiency Anemia in Premenopausal Women

From a brief Q&A with Daniela Ginta, a freelance writer based in Kamloops, BC, writing a feature article on women's health for a Canadian publication.

1. Do women experience fluctuating carbohydrate cravings and if yes, what is the most probable cause (or causes)? How to best manage such cravings? Read more

 

Don't Forget These 3 Markers When Looking to Lose Fat

Just a brief post to continue with recent thoughts on making dietary choices that support losing fat while improving health and longevity.

Most people who embark on the journey of losing fat cut down on carb-rich foods, often categorized as white foods like potatoes, rice, bread, pasta, and sugar. Some will also avoid fruit, believing that ingestion of natural fruit sugar (fructose) leads to large spikes in insulin release which in turn contributes to insensitivity to insulin over time, leading to accumulation of fat. Read more

 

5 Keys to Losing Fat While Improving Health and Longevity

Any diet or pattern of eating that relies on calorie restriction to a point where real hunger is an ongoing challenge isn't good for longevity.

The reason is simple - calorie restriction leads to loss of fat and muscle. Losing fat is generally good for longevity. Loss of skeletal muscle - called sarcopenia - is very bad for short and long term health. The amount of skeletal muscle mass we carry is a strong predictive marker for longevity. Read more

 

Touch One Strand And The Entire Web Wavers

I've long felt that a fundamental flaw with conventional health care is to view and treat the body in segments. Can we really compartmentalize parts of our body and fix just one area without considering all of our other tissues? Read more

 

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