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Simple Miso | Dwen Jang Soup Recipe

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Ingredients:

Miso or Dwen Jang (Korean version)
Vegetable or Chicken Broth
Cabbage, chopped into bite-size pieces
Onions, chopped into bite-size pieces
Firm Tofu, cubed into bite-size pieces

Directions:

1. Bring broth to a boil in a soup pot - use as much as you would like to make.

2. Add cabbage and onions and simmer until both are tender.

3. Add a heaping tablespoon of dwen jang to the soup directly or use a strainer that is immersed in the soup to squeeze the miso through with a spoon. Using a strainer results in a lighter consistency. Stir well to evenly distribute dwen jang. Have a taste and add more dwen jang if needed to suit your tastebuds.

4. Add tofu.

Serve with a side of steamed rice and any other sides you wish. Feel free to add chopped green onions just before serving for extra flavour and colour.

If you would like added creamy texture and more substance to your miso soup, you can add cubed Yukon gold potatoes when you add the cabbage and onions.

If you enjoy a little heat to your miso soup, add gochujang when you add dwen jang.

 
 

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Comments

So happy I have found your site : )

Love your kimchi recipe with apple and pear and your pickled radishes with tumeric and honey have become a staple here.

Quick question: what is the ratio of miso to broth? Is it 1 tablespoon to 1 cup of broth?

Thank you!

Thank you Rose!

I don't have an exact ratio, as I've always made it to taste. But if pressed to guess, I would say I typically use 1 heaping tablespoon for every 4 or 5 cups of unsalted broth.

If your broth is salted, then you can use less.

Typically miso soup is made a little saltier than most western soups, as miso soup is eaten with rice which isn't salty at all, so the two complement each other well.

I hope this helps!

Ben